Open Search
Open Navigation

Is Universal Screening Worth the Investment for Schools?

Alliant International University
Published 09/11/2014
2 minutes read
The content of this page is only for informational purposes and is not intended, expressly or by implication, as a guarantee of employment or salary, which vary based on many factors including but not limited to education, credentials, and experience. Alliant International University explicitly makes no representations or guarantees about the accuracy of the information provided by any prospective employer or any other website. Salary information available on the internet may not reflect the typical experience of Alliant graduates. Alliant does not guarantee that any graduate will be placed with a particular employer or in any specific employment position.

Universal Screening in Educational Settings: Evidence-Based Decision Making for Schools, edited by Ryan J. Kettler, Todd A. Glover, Craig A. Albers, and Kelly A. Feeney-Kettler, addresses the utility of universal screenings in schools for assessing academic competencies and the socioemotional and behavioral needs of students. The book provides guidance for implementing universal screening in educational settings and framing the approach within a Response to Intervention (RTI) model, and it heralds the use of screening as an important strategy for improving school performance.

According to reviewer Oscar Barbarin, the book makes a convincing case for universal screenings in educational settings, as it “highlights the relevance and applicability of psychological science to many of the most pressing and worrisome issues facing schools” (para. 8). Barbarin also points out lingering issues that need further consideration:

• Although schools are likely to see the value in screening for academic competencies given the current climate of “high-stakes” testing, the same cannot be said for allocating resources to universal socioemotional and behavioral screening. Do you agree with this assumption? Can a convincing case be made that socialemotional/behavioral screening is worth the investment given schools’ limited resources?

• Barbarin believes there is “the danger of reifying children's status on a screening tool in a way that transforms individual differences on a screening tool into a category such asdeficientat risk, or failing” (para. 9). Do you agree that this is cause for concern? How can schools minimize the risk of labeling on the basis of results from screening?

Read the Review

Do More Data Make for Better School Outcomes?
By Oscar Barbarin
PsycCRITIQUES, 2014 Vol 59(32)

You might also like

Back to Blog
Learn More
Alliant International University

What Is Clinical Psychopharmacology?

What Is Clinical Psychopharmacology? According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, the average number of adults in the U.S. reporting...

Learn More
Alliant International University

PsyD Marital and Family Career Paths

PsyD Marital and Family Career Paths Choosing an area of specialization in psychology isn’t always easy, but Marriage and Family...

Learn More
Alliant International University

MFT Courses and Curriculum

What Courses Do You Have to Take When Doing an MFT Program? In early human development, the family plays a huge role in shaping a...

Anchor
pass led us here

Start on your path to impact today.