Open Search
Open Navigation

PsycCRITIQUES Blog: Should Psychologists Embrace or Abandon DSM‑5?

Alliant International University
Published 11/21/2013
2 minutes read
The content of this page is only for informational purposes and is not intended, expressly or by implication, as a guarantee of employment or salary, which vary based on many factors including but not limited to education, credentials, and experience. Alliant International University explicitly makes no representations or guarantees about the accuracy of the information provided by any prospective employer or any other website. Salary information available on the internet may not reflect the typical experience of Alliant graduates. Alliant does not guarantee that any graduate will be placed with a particular employer or in any specific employment position.

Should Psychologists Embrace or Abandon DSM‑5?

The November 20th release of PsycCRITIQUES includes two reviews of the newly released Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as well as reviews of four other books relevant to the new edition of the manual. These reviews, written by several of the most prominent authorities in the field, are often—but not uniformly—critical of the latest version of the DSM.

Psychologists almost always have the option of using codes from the World Health Organization's (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD), and use of ICD-10 codes will be required by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) after October 1, 2014. Use of a standardized nomenclature will bring diagnostic coding in the United States in line with the taxonomy used by other WHO member countries, and it will facilitate cross-cultural research on mental illness.

Has the DSM outlived its usefulness? Does it have any value other than serving as an important reference tool and repository for mental health information? Is it overpriced? Should psychology professors teach both ICD and DSM coding, or will mastering the ICD codes be sufficient for clinical practice?

Read the Reviews

Let's Help Psychiatry Get Back on the Right Track…Again!
By Theodore Millon
PsycCRITIQUES, 2013 Vol 58(45)

 

  • A review of the books Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM–5; Desk Reference to the Diagnostic Criteria From DSM–5; and The Pocket Guide to the DSM–5 Diagnostic Exam

On the Origin of the Specious: The Evolution of the DSM–5
By Greg J. Neimeyer
PsycCRITIQUES, 2013 Vol 58(45)

 

  • A review of the books Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM–5; Desk Reference to the Diagnostic Criteria From DSM–5; and The Pocket Guide to the DSM–5 Diagnostic Exam

DSM–5: The Perfect Storm 
By Peter E. Nathan
PsycCRITIQUES, 2013 Vol 58(45)

 

  • A review of the books Saving Normal: An Insider's Revolt Against Out-of-Control Psychiatric Diagnosis, DSM–5, Big Pharma, and the Medicalization of Ordinary Life; The Book of Woe: The DSM and the Unmaking of Psychiatry; and Our Necessary Shadow: The Nature and Meaning of Psychiatry

Mental Health on Trial 
By Richard Frank
PsycCRITIQUES, 2013 Vol 58(45)

 

  • A review of Mad Science: Psychiatric Coercion, Diagnosis, and Drugs

You might also like

Back to Blog
Learn More
Alliant International University

What to Look For in Psychology Graduate Programs

What to Look For in Psychology Graduate Programs The process of getting a graduate degree in psychology can feel confusing at...

Learn More
Alliant International University

Types of Psychology Graduate Programs

What Are the Different Graduate Psychology Degree Programs Available? Psychology is a wide-ranging field with numerous niches and...

Learn More
Alliant International University

PsyD vs. PhD: What's the Difference?

PsyD vs. PhD: What’s the Difference? Applying to a graduate program means encountering a sea of new acronyms– GRE, MSW, MA, PhD...

Anchor
students of LGBT Certificate program standing on floor with slogan

Start on your path to impact today.