Open Search
Open Navigation

Bringing Strengths to Populations With Disabilities

Alliant International University
Published 05/08/2014
2 minutes read
The content of this page is only for informational purposes and is not intended, expressly or by implication, as a guarantee of employment or salary, which vary based on many factors including but not limited to education, credentials, and experience. Alliant International University explicitly makes no representations or guarantees about the accuracy of the information provided by any prospective employer or any other website. Salary information available on the internet may not reflect the typical experience of Alliant graduates. Alliant does not guarantee that any graduate will be placed with a particular employer or in any specific employment position.

If there was ever a group who could benefit from a strengths-based approach to psycholgical well-being, it is people with disabilities. But, ironically, such individuals have been marginalized and stereotyped for decades. Michael Wehmeyer's edited text, The Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology and Disability, offers a welcomed shift.

In their PsycCRITIQUES review of the book, Kara Ayers and Stephanie Weber highlight the importance of bringing positive psychology approaches to both research studies and clinical practice with people with disabilities. They observe,

The contributions of positive psychology to professionals who work with individuals with disabilities are immense, as the paradigm shift from deficit-based to strengths-based models could significantly improve treatment outcomes as well as the general attitudes of society. (section Pitfalls and Limitations, para. 3)

What are the necessary ingredients for a practitioner to make this paradigm shift from a deficit-based to a strengths-based approach with individuals with disabilities? How can this be sustained? If a paradigm shift can be achieved with practitioners, could it eventually impact societal attitudes?

Is there any benefit to taking a deficit-based approach to people with disabilities? Can one still be a good clinician if one overlooks a strengths-based approach among people with disabilities?

What are the most important strengths to help people with disabilities capitalize on? Skill-based strengths, external strengths (e.g., resources), talents/abilities, character strengths...all of the above?

 

Read the Review

Approaching Disability From a Strengths-Based Perspective
By Kara Ayers and Stephanie Weber
PsycCRITIQUES, 2014 Vol 59(12)

You might also like

Back to Blog
Learn More
Alliant International University

What Is Clinical Psychopharmacology?

What Is Clinical Psychopharmacology? According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, the average number of adults in the U.S. reporting...

Learn More
Alliant International University

PsyD Marital and Family Career Paths

PsyD Marital and Family Career Paths Choosing an area of specialization in psychology isn’t always easy, but Marriage and Family...

Learn More
Alliant International University

MFT Courses and Curriculum

What Courses Do You Have to Take When Doing an MFT Program? In early human development, the family plays a huge role in shaping a...

Anchor
pass led us here

Start on your path to impact today.