Frequently Asked Questions

Is San Francisco Law School Accredited?
Yes.  San Francisco Law School has been continuously accredited by the State Bar of California since 1937, when accreditation was started.

Additionally, San Francisco Law School is one of the schools of Alliant International University, which is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).  As such, it is approved by the United States Department of Education (DOE) to offer financial assistance to qualified students.

Is San Francisco Law School approved by the American Bar Association (ABA )?
No.  And since one of our historical goals is to keep legal education affordable for opportunity students, it is unlikely that San Francisco Law School would seek such approval in the near future.

What is the tuition at San Francisco Law School?
The tuition at San Francisco Law School is $875/[unit. The general fees are $200 per student, and the computer-exam fees are $25 dollars per semester. That being the case, the tuition at San Francisco Law School is about one half or less than the tuitions of other law schools in our area.

Is financial assistance available?
Yes. Since the program at San Francisco Law School has been approved by the United States Department of Education, qualified students are eligible for federal assistance. Because the tuition at San Francisco Law School is so reasonable, and since it is a part-time program, students are encouraged to borrow only what they truly need, in order to leave law school with as little debt as possible.

Does San Francisco Law School offer a full-time program?
Yes. In addition to its part-time evening program, the school’s San Francisco campus offers a full-time (daytime) curriculum, providing students greater educational flexibility. The number of additional classes and sections offered as part of the full-time program is dependent on enrollment; the same restrictions apply to the offering of elective courses in both the full- and part-time programs.  (The San Diego campus at present offers only a part-time evening curriculum.)

How many nights per week do students attend law school in the part-time evening program?
By ordinary, part-time evening students at San Francisco Law School take 10 units per semester by attending classes Mondays through Thursdays, from 6:20 p.m. to either 8:10 or 9:10 p.m., depending on whether the class that evening is a two- or three-unit course.  Academic Support sessions are held on a weekly basis and are open to all students.

Do the students attend law school in the summer?
Yes. During the summer term, first- and third-year students take courses aimed at honing their test-taking skills in preparation for the California Bar Examination; second-year students take a Moot Court class; and elective courses are available to all students.

Do the students get vacation time?
Yes. Students get approximately two weeks following the spring semester and two weeks before the beginning of the fall semester. (Often, this will be two weeks in mid-May and the first two weeks of August.)

Does San Francisco Law School offer online courses?
Yes. In the fall 2011 semester, San Francisco Law School offered its first (asynchronous) online course, in Professional Responsibility; the same class was held online in a synchronous format at the San Diego campus during the summer 2015 term. The Law School is currently in the process of expanding its online curriculum and expects to offer additional such courses in the near future.

Do I need to graduate from college to apply to law school?
No. Students with an AA or AS degree – as well as those who have earned at least 60 approved academic units — may apply to law school. Additionally, students who have not earned a degree or the minimum 60 approved academic units may apply after taking three of the required CLEP examinations.

Does San Francisco Law School require an applicant to take the LSAT (Law School Admissions Test)?
Yes.  Applicants must take the LSAT and although not required, they may choose to have their information and documents transmitted directly to San Francisco Law School by LSDAS (the Law School Data Assembly Service).