The Many Career Paths with an Education Degree

The Many Career Paths with an Education Degree

When you think about career paths with an education degree, one job in particular probably comes to mind: teacher. Few degree programs have such a limited stereotypical career path as the field of education. While many graduates of an education degree program do go on to become teachers, this isn’t the only career opportunity you can pursue with an education degree. From school administration to non-profits to traditional corporate environments, career opportunities abound for people with the skills developed in a teacher preparation program.

Whether you’re considering an education degree and want to know its full potential, or you’re already a teacher and are looking to explore different options, we lined up a variety of non-teaching jobs that professionals with an education degree can pursue.

Non-Teaching Careers in Education

Maybe you like being in an education environment – just not in the classroom. If you’re passionate about education but know that you don’t want to teach, a wide variety of career opportunities are still available to you.

Education Administration. Move from the classroom to the front office. Make an impact on a larger group of students. Principals and superintendents set policy and make decisions on a school-wide or school district-wide level. They work with teachers and the school board, review curriculum, develop educational policies, manage budgets and personnel, and much more. If you’re interested in taking your career this route, you will likely need an advanced degree, such as an EdD in Educational Leadership and Management – an investment that is sure to pay off.

School Counselor. Maybe you enjoy working with students and guiding their personal and academic development – just not in a classroom with the pressures and stressors of a traditional teaching job. School counselors have the ability to work with a large group of the student population. They provide guidance and help students discover and achieve their personal goals. (Learn more about becoming a school counselor.)

Instructional Coordinator. Quality curriculum is a decisive factor in the effectiveness of education. Instructional coordinators evaluate, develop, and implement curriculum for schools to ensure that it is meeting standards established by local school boards, as well as state and federal regulations. Instructional coordinators work in a school setting with teachers, principals, and superintendents, and contribute in positive ways to the education of students – without having to interact with them personally.

Non-Teaching Careers Outside Education

An education degree is more versatile than you might think. The knowledge earned and skills developed in an education program can serve you well in a number of positions outside the traditional school setting. If you’re not interested in teaching – and not interested in working in a school either – you can still consider some of the following careers:

Corporate Learning. Understanding the learning process and how to develop and deliver instructional materials could make you a good candidate for the field of corporate training and development. Professionals in this career path plan, develop, and implement employee training programs, which can be delivered through a variety of formats, including instructional manuals, lectures, video presentations, or hands-on, collaborative experiences. If teaching adults and working in a more corporate environment sound appealing to you, this could be the career route to pursue.

Educational Sales. If you have experience as a teacher, you may be well-poised to pursue a career in sales for educational materials: textbooks, school supplies, educational software, etc. Having past experience in the industry will help you better understand the challenges and frustrations of your customers, helping you to connect with them and ultimately better deliver what they need – in turn helping to make you successful as well.

Non-Profit and Government Work. An education background can also be put to good use in a variety of non-profit and government organizations. Serve as a liaison for an education advocacy organization. Manage an after-school youth program. Take your experiences to the Department of Education. Numerous opportunities exist in these two sectors!

Non-Traditional Teaching Careers

Maybe you don’t think teaching is all that bad – you just don’t want to do it in a traditional classroom setting. Lucky for you, many careers in teaching don’t need to happen in a classroom setting.

Professional Tutor. Deliver one-on-one help and instruction. Choose your own clients and make your own hours. Starting your own tutoring business offers the freedom to teach on your own terms. Nervous about starting out on your own? You can always join a pre-existing tutoring business to develop a better understanding of the business side of things – or you can check out Alliant’s MBA in Entrepreneurship program to develop the business acumen you need to be successful!

Online Instructor. More and more education is being delivered in an online format, from K-12 high schools to higher education degree programs. Becoming an online teacher will challenge your time management and communication skills, but it also offers greater flexibility.

Pursue a Rewarding Career through an Education Degree

With an education degree, you can do so much more than just teach. Through the California School of Education, Alliant offers a wide variety of education degrees, from doctorate programs all the way down to credential and certificate programs. Whether your passion is in counseling, special education, or leadership, we have a degree program to suit your career goals. Interested in learning more? Contact us today!